Theologians Who Just Happen to Be Female

This is part of the ‘Girly Girl’ Week here at Cheese-Wearing Theology.

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I’ve been trying to put together a list of female theologians to read. The thing is, levitra I’m not really interested in gender studies or feminist theology, sickness so I find that that significantly limits the number of women theologians I read.

Female theologians are not just writing about feminism. In fact, there are some amazing contributions being made in the areas of Christology, ecclesiology, soteriology and much, much more.

Here are just a few women to highlight:


Kathryn Tanner:
Dr. Tanner is Professor of Systematic Theology at Yale Divinity School. She has written several books, including Christ the Key, and Jesus, Humanity and the Trinity. Ben Myers has said this about Dr. Tanner:
“In my view, Kathryn Tanner is one of the best theologians working in the Reformed tradition today – she has both a profound grasp of the dogmatic tradition and an acute sensitivity to the contemporary theological situation.” See also, Chris Tessone’s Why I Love Kathryn Tanner and Tripp Fuller’s I Heart Kathryn Tanner’s Christocentric Christology!

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Sarah Coakley:
I first came across Dr. Coakley’s writings while doing research on the Council of Chalcedon for a Barth paper. Dr. Coakley is Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge. According to her faculty page, she is working on a four volume systematic theology (Yay!). Check out her suggestions of 5 essential theology books of the last 25 years.

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Nancey Murphy:
Technically Dr. Murphy is a philosopher, but much of her work intersects with theology, and has been invaluable to my studies. Dr. Murphy is Professor of Christian Philosophy at Fuller Theological Seminary. In her writings on the human soul, Dr. Murphy argues for a non-reductive physicalist position (i.e., there is no dichotomy of body and ‘soul’).

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Ellen Charry:
Dr. Charry is Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. I’ve become interested in Dr. Charry’s work on the theology of happiness. There is much overlap between Dr. Charry’s work and work that is currently being done in the field of positive psychology.

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Marva Dawn:
Dr. Dawn is a teaching fellow at Regent College in Vancouver, B.C. Dr. Dawn has written on worship, pastoral theology and much more. Her book, Powers, Weakness, and the Tabernacling of God won a Christianity Today Book Award. And of course, her book Reaching out without Dumbing Down is a must-read for anyone involved in leading worship in the Church.

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A few more that I have read:

Catherine LaCugna: God for Us: The Trinity and the Christian Life.

Elizabeth Johnson: Consider Jesus: Waves of Renewal in Christology.

Amy Marga: Jesus Christ and the modern sinner: Karl Barth’s retrieval of Luther’s substantive Christology.

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So who are you reading?

  • Love Dr. Murphy’s work, some of her work you have to take your time going through but it is well worth it.

    • Allen,
      I agree.
      I found that the best way to read Dr. Murphy is in small chunks.

  • Don’t forget Mary Ann Fatula’s The Triune God of Christian Faith

    • Craig,
      I’ll have to look that one up. Thanks!

  • Erin

    I read that Marva Dawn book in Nashville. Very good! I also enjoyed her book, Truly the Community, which we read as part of a book study with Rev. Denise a couple years ago.

    • Erin,
      You’re right, ‘Truly The Community’ is another great book by Dr. Dawn!

  • Vicki

    I am loving your posts. You have given me so great resources both through the books that you have posted and other links I’ve discovered through them. I look forward to continuing to follow your blog series.

  • Ally

    forgot to comment when I read this post first (on my phone) and saved it as unread to clip to evernote later so I’m commenting now – Thanks! =D

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